Articles by Ana Fuentes

About the Author

Ana Fuentes
Ana Fuentes is The Corner Editor-in-Chief. Currently based in Madrid, she has been a correspondent in New York, Beijing and Paris for several international media outlets such as Prisa Radio, Radio Netherlands or CNN en español. Ana holds a degree in Journalism from the Complutense University in Madrid and the Sorbonne University in Paris, and a Masters in Journalism from Spanish newspaper El País. You can contact her at: anaf[at]thecorner.eu

Norway's sovereign fund

“Norway’s Sovereign Fund Has Not Changed How It’s Structured For Over 10 Years”

Fixed income’s scant returns has led Norway’s sovereign fund to focus on equity investment. This now accounts for 65 percent of exposure. At the same time, the Norwegian government estimates that investment in the stock market will reach 70 percent to boost profits in the coming years. Hilde C. Bjørnland, professor of Economics at the Norwegian Business School and Director of the Centre for applied economy and oil explains why.



Candance Johnson on Estonia e-residency card

“Estonia Can Be Delaware In The EU, With Its E-Residency Card”

After participating in the founding of Astra and SES (which today operates 52 geostationary satellites, capable of reaching 99% of the world population), Candance Johnson leads the European association of ‘business angels’. She is determined to build an online network of investors and provide the European Union with a “nation of investors”…



cabiedes

“There Are Lots Of Amateurs In Spain Using Public Money For Venture Capital”

Luis Martín Cabiedes started investing in technology ‘startups’ in 1998,first as a ‘business angel’ and then via his own venture capital firm (Cabiedes & Partners SCR). He has invested in over 80 companies, including Ole, Myalert, Privalia and Trovit. He points that there are venture capital funds in Spain with 90% of public money.”


waiter

Spanish jobless rate drops to a still painful 20%

Summer’s here and so are seasonal contracts. The latest employment survey showed the jobless rate in Spain went down to 20% in Q2, its lowest level since the summer of 2010. And yet employment is still a heavy burden for Spaniards, Greece being the only EU country with a higher rate.


tamborini

“What Austerity Has Done Is To Highlight The Poor Management Of The Crisis”

Roberto Tamborini, author, Professor of Economy at Trento University says The Corner at this interview that “we can only start on the road towards a satisfactory recovery with fiscal and monetary coordination in the eurozone, and this fiscal stimulus can only be coordinated via Brussels. This directly calls into question the eurozone’s economic governance, one of the pillars of which is the Maastrich principle of exclusive national responsability.”


chislett

“Spain’s Jobless Rate Would Cause Serious Social Problems In Northern Europe”

Ana Fuentes | “Spaniards tend to be schizophrenic because they all want the best services, like they have in the Nordic countries, free education…and you can only have this by paying much higher taxes than we do in Spain where there is a huge amount of fraud and tax evasion,” says William Chislett, associate researcher at the Elcano Royal Institute and former correspondent for The Times and the Financial Times.


cost-of-equity

The Cost Of Capital Is Rising –Yet It Is Hard To Estimate By How Much

Higher capital requirements after the financial crisis are pushing up the cost of capital for European banks. The key question is by how much, since the return on equity required in order to compensate investors for the risk they undertake can be difficult to determine because it is unobservable.