Articles by Ana Fuentes

About the Author

Ana Fuentes
Ana Fuentes is The Corner Editor-in-Chief. Currently based in Madrid, she has been a correspondent in New York, Beijing and Paris for several international media outlets such as Prisa Radio, Radio Netherlands or CNN en español. Ana holds a degree in Journalism from the Complutense University in Madrid and the Sorbonne University in Paris, and a Masters in Journalism from Spanish newspaper El País. You can contact her at: anaf[at]thecorner.eu

The battle for EU’s top jobs is on- What are Spain´s chances?

Ana Fuentes | The musical chairs for top institutional renewal in Brussels has begun. At stake are the presidencies of the European Commission, the European Council, the European Parliament and the European Central Bank, as well as the representative for Unión diplomacy. For Spain, opportunities may open up. Yet the government has to deal with the after effects of the Catalan conflict, which has not questioned its democratic legitimacy, although it may compromise its margin of maneuver.


EU elections: Highest turnout in 40 years and a golden chance for Spain

Ana Fuentes | In Spain, the results have been very markedly pro-European and the Socialist Party is the one that will contribute the most MEPs in Strasbourg. For some analysts, it is a golden opportunity that the government of Pedro Sánchez should take advantage of to increase the Spanish weight in the decisions, instead of having to be always subordinated to the Franco-German axis.


European elections: end of an era

Ana Fuentes (Brussels) | In a week´s time we will know the results of the European elections, the road map of the EU in a delicate moment of great fragmentation. To think in the classical left-right divide is a mistake. What matters is playing out in a cross bordering way: those that believe in Europe, although they question it in many areas, versus those who seek fewer concessions and more returns, more power for the sovereign states, even though they receive European funds.



Spanish socialist leader Pedro Sánchez's agenda

Spanish economy: when elections cloud the data

Ana Fuentes | Spain and the US are the only developed countries which are going to grow more than 2% in 2019 according to the IMF. On the case of Spain, exports, which were driving the country’s growth, have weakened, but domestic demand has grown. The risk premium is just below 100 basis points, compared to Italy’s 250 b.p. But beyond the data, the analysis is currently conditioned by the effect of the electoral campaign.



European equities

European equity markets: “All the ideas are priced in”

Ana Fuentes | Funds´ volume of cash has reduced considerably in February and Europe is the region that has most benefited from asset allocation. A report by BofA Securities indicates that just in February $11.8bn has entered European equity markets. “All the ideas are put in the price”, explains Oscar Anaya, head of institutional sales at Tradition Securities and Futures Spain, “In one sense it is normal, but we are rather left in no man´s territory”.

 


MEP Ramón Jáuregui

“We all know that unanimity is the thorn in the side of the European Union”

Ana Fuentes (Strasbourg) | Where should the EU look in the future? What are the priorities? At a time of rapid change, protectionism and nationalist populism, the European Parliament has approved a document of minimums called The Future of Europe. As inevitably happens in such plural institutions, it is neither binding nor completely satisfies anyone, but sets out the challenges the still 28 members have to confront together if the European project is not to diluted. We discuss it with Ramón Jáuregui, socialist MEP and rapporteur of the text.


UN minorities rapporteur: A scrutiny which deserves to be scrutinised

UN Minorities Rapporteur: A Scrutiny Which Deserves To Be Scrutinised

Ana Fuentes | A special rapporteur from the UN visited Spain to “collect first hand information on the situation of minorities in the country, identify good practice and key areas which need improvement”. Why he chose the fourth economy in the Eurozone after Bostwana and Slovenia is a mystery.