Articles by Fernando Gonzalez Urbaneja

About the Author

Fernando Gonzalez Urbaneja
Over 30 years working in economic journalism. Fernando was founder and chief-editor at El País, general editor at the business daily Cinco Días, and now teaches at Universidad Carlos III. He's been president of the Madrid Press Association and the Spanish Federation of Press Associations. He's also member of the Spanish press complaints commission.
Congreso-Diputados

Spain: On the verge of new round of elections

Fernando G. Urbaneja | One of the values of Spain’s democracy over the last forty years has been left behind following the general elections: namely, political stability. Now the Spanish political scenario resembles more that of Belgium than Germany. The results obtained on December 20th have disappointed all parties’ expectations for putting together a parliamentary model, leaving all the hipotheses on how to form a stable government in the dark.



Santander's Spain business

Santander bank starts a federal model

MADRID | July 8, 2015 | Fernando G. Urbaneja | Spanish bank Santander appointed a separate board of directors in Spain, independent from the Group board, which reports to shareholders and regulators. A new federal model that gives the  eurozone’s largest lender by market capitalisation a structure in each one of the markets where it operates, in some cases under a local brand.







Telefonica

Telefonica: A shift towards added value

MADRID | May 19, 2015 | By Fernando G. Urbaneja | Telefonica’s first quarter results show a company which has reorganised over the last year, consolidating positions in its core markets of Europe and Latin America, where three benchmark countries Spain, Brazil and Germany account for two thirds of group income. It has a somewhat uneven presence in another 8 American countries, ranging from Mexico (4% of the business, without being market leader) to Argentina (9% of the business and market leadership). 


Investment in Spain

Foreign investors own half of Spanish debt

MADRID | May 12, 2015 | By Fernando G. UrbanejaThe show of confidence belies an economic weakness: half of Spain’s debt is in the hands of foreign investors. After the uncertainties leading up to the summer of 2012, they are once again stocking up their portfolios with Spanish securities.