Articles by Victor Jimenez

About the Author

Victor Jimenez
London contributor at thecorner.eu, reporting about the City and the Eurozone economies. He regularly writes for Spanish newspaper group Prensa Ibérica--some of his features include shared work with journalists of The Daily Telegraph and the BBC.
Brexit storm approcahing

The UK And The Brexit Storm Which Is Approaching

Top economists and heads of UK institutions and companies are demanding a clear strategy from Downing Street on how the government will collaborate to weather the Brexit storm. Many are sceptical about the overly-optimistic picture painted by Theresa May and Philip Hammond about the economic future.


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Brexit Debate Warms Up

Multinationals such as Airbus or Aviva Investors are arguing in favour of the ‘In’ vote, warning that a possible Brexit would push the UK into recession before year-end.


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Brexit Is A Matter Of Psychology

Brexit supporters do not need to make any noise. They have been decades using the EU as a scapegoat for their problems of excessive regulation, arbitrary taxation, lack of transparency… Now it’s Cameron who must prove the opposite.


The City’s One Thousand Wounds

The European financial center still cherishes the hope that the debt markets will brighten up before the end of the year. It would help if the catastrophic headlines stopped.


The City of London

High Yield: QE heats up City of London

LONDON | March 18, 2015 | By Víctor JiménezThe effects of QE have already begun to reverberate through the arteries of Europe’s financial heart in the City of London. Indeed, there is a tsunami of money flooding the market, corporate bonds sub-investment market. That below triple B ratings market is the ‘acid test’: the ECB’s bet has been dragging down the price of investors and asset managers’ portfolios, who are desperate to find substantial interest rates and return to positive territory.

 


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UK: let’s be more British, please

LONDON | By Víctor Jiménez Raise the main interest rate? Certainly not. Or not yet, anyway. While the US economy is not showing clear signs of having overcome the assisted breathing phase (i.e. printing money or the recently wound up phase of quantitative easing that the Fed finished two weeks ago), the chances are that the Bank of England will keep the price of the pound at a very low level. 


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UK: Reputation can’t be bought at the supermarket

LONDON | By Víctor Jiménez | We leave the Thameslink station, in the southern section of Ludgate Hill Street that leads to the door of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. We are close to Square Mile. On our way to his office, the veteran financial journalist Jon Hay explains that Euromoney (one of the large market information publishing companies in Europe) has started to hire new reporters to cover, for instance, the latest data on the collateralised loan obligations (‘CLOs’), which are one of the debt structures that got deflated after the 2007 credit bubble burst. 


Scottish Independence Referendum

UK: Have you heard about the new Scottish financial City?

LONDON | By Víctor Jiménez | The financial services industry in Scotland is more than twice as large as that of the rest of the UK when compared to the gross domestic product. But where the unionism points out an unaffordable risk, some analysts see an opportunity. (Image: The first minister of Scotland, Alex Salmond by Robert Perry/EPA)


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The mirage of the British economy

LONDON | By Víctor Jiménez | The image of the Bank of England’s monetary policy Committee, which met in early July to not issue any decision on interest rates, was at the same time historic and false.


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UK: Balance sheets and the power of the mass

LONDON- THE WEEK THAT WAS | By Víctor Jiménez | Thrilling? Not exactly. Unless you file accounts for a rogue large company, the rabbit out of the top hat the Financial Reporting Council pulled this week should have left a too familiar, dull sight printed on the retina: the watchdog suggested a named-and-shamed punishment for both public and private companies whose reporting standards fall below legal requirements. Duh.