spanish politics

Mariano Rajoy has left the Moncloa to be replaced by the socialist leader Pedro Sanchez

Two Weeks Of Political Upheaval In Spain

Fernando G. Urbaneja | Mariano Rajoy has left the Moncloa to be replaced by the socialist leader Pedro Sanchez, who 10 days before couldn´t have imagined a substitution so rapid or so brutal. However, Spain’s problems remain: whether the demands for Catalan independence and other nationalist forces that threaten the constitution and national unity, or the urgent need for profound reforms in the welfare system and the management of public accounts, threatened by the deficit and the debt.


Spanish political scene: a new mould after 40 years of democracy

The New Spanish Government Holds Win-Win Cards

J.P. Marín Arrese | PM Pedro Sánchez will govern backed by a weak minority party. There will be little respite from either those who voted for him or those who voted against him. No one expects the new Spanish government can deliver any substantive policies. Yet, such an isolated and weak position can also be a valuable asset.


Spain Is Not Italy

Shaun Riordan | The motion of censure against Spanish Prime Minister and the election of socialist leader Sanchez as his successor has briefly spooked markets. But in the end it may make less difference than it seems at first sight.


The Ibex 35 Recovers After The Censure Motion

Victoria Torre (SelfBank) | A tense day was expected in Spanish financial markets, with the vote on the censure motion against the government of Mariano Rajoy and doubts about whether the President would resign. He didn´t and the censure motion was adopted with 180 votes in favour.


The Government of Spain takes an experimental path

Fernando G. Urbaneja | The Spanish parliament has suddenly and unexpectedly used a constitutional motion of censure against the government of Rajoy to elect a new government. The new government returns Spain to the ancient ghosts of the first third of the 20th century: multi-party and fractured coalitions.

 


A no-confidence motion has removed Mr Rajoy from Spain's government

Why The Basque Nationalists Decided Rajoy’s Fate

Shaun Riordan | The fate of Spanish Prime Minister Rajoy was in the end settled by the five votes of the Basque Nationalist Party (PNV). Until yesterday´s debate in the Congress, Rajoy was confident that the Basques, who last week voted in favour of the 2018 budget, would abstain. This would have denied socialist leader of the absolute majority he needed to eject Rajoy from the Moncloa Palace. But this time the Basque Nationalist Party had other priorities.


If The New Spanish Government Complies With General Budget, Economic Growth Should Not Be Derailed

In Spain today all eyes will be on the voting on the no-confidence motion which we expect will be successful. Unless current Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy decides to resign ahead of the vote. So everything points to PSOE leader, Pedro Sánchez, becoming the new Prime Minister. It looks like he will not propose new elections immediately, which we believe will prolong the political instability in the country.


The debt of Rajoy and Sanchez

Spain’s Motion Of Censure: Medium-Low Probability Of Being Successful

The Spanish government is facing a motion of censure. In the country’s parliamentary system, if one is presented it requires that an alternative candidate be put forward, who will certainly be the socialist Pedro Sánchez. The debate and the voting will be held on 31 May and 1 June, respectively. Considering the current composition of parliament, Bankinter’s experts provide below the three possible numeric combinations needed for the motion of censure to go through.


Germany Is Not Catalonia’s Pro-Independence

Is Germany pro-independence? No, no it isn’t, despite the fact that the separtist propaganda operates intelligently in Germany – with Puigdemont top of the list, in his role as the victim of an oppressive and anti-democratic Spain.