brexit

'Brexitology': we could get to October without clarifying anything

‘Brexitology’: We Could Get To October Without Clarifying Anything

Ofelia Marín-Lozano (1962 Capital SICAV) | 12 April was the deadline for the UK to decide of it was going to leave the EU without an agreement or, on the other hand, seek a new delay. The worst scenario for markets, a no deal Brexit, has been ruled out. The EU have granted the UK a new delay, which ends at the end of October 2019, to see if they can finally come to some kind of conclusion.


PM Theresa May wins election without majority

Brexit extension: how much will it actually cost the UK to leave the EU?

Jonathan Perraton via The Conversation UK | EU leaders have agreed a short extension to Brexit until October 31 at the latest, in order to give the British parliament time to agree a deal. This date avoids the UK still being a member when the next EU budget cycle starts – but what does it mean for the “divorce bill”, the money the UK will pay the EU after its departure?


Uncertainty? Volatility index 20% below its historical average

After a period of gloomy macro data, market watchers are starting to see the light. According to Allianz research, the share of “bulls” has increasedfrom around 30% at the start of the year to currently 54% net. At the same time, the volatility index is some 20% below its historical average, in spite of the much greater uncertainty facing the world economy.


The European Non-Union And Brexit – Plus Ça Change …

Shaun Riordan | This week is billed as, yet another, crucial week in the Brexit process. Prime Minister May will yet again bring her withdrawal deal back to parliament. Little has changed since she last presented it, and it looks like being rejected again.


MEP Ramón Jáuregui

“We all know that unanimity is the thorn in the side of the European Union”

Ana Fuentes (Strasbourg) | Where should the EU look in the future? What are the priorities? At a time of rapid change, protectionism and nationalist populism, the European Parliament has approved a document of minimums called The Future of Europe. As inevitably happens in such plural institutions, it is neither binding nor completely satisfies anyone, but sets out the challenges the still 28 members have to confront together if the European project is not to diluted. We discuss it with Ramón Jáuregui, socialist MEP and rapporteur of the text.


“We have such an incompetent government in the UK, incapable of building any consensus"

“We Have Such An Incompetent Government In The UK, Incapable Of Building Any Consensus”

Julia Pastor | From an English father and a Ghanaian mother, Afua Hirsch is a journalist, writer, lawyer and activist for human rights. Her first book, “Brit (ish): On race, identity and belonging”, published current year, has stirred UK historic consciousness by exploring the origin of the identity crisis that the country is suffering, and which, no doubt, has its reflection on the winding road of Brexit.


Brexit is not about compromise

Brexit Is Not About Compromise

Ultimately, May’s deal represents a compromise of the vague objectives for Brexit. However, Brexit has never been about compromise and with both sides of the debate envisaging different outcomes to the process, neither appear about to make concessions now. In this context, analysts at AXA IM continue to see the ‘most likely’ outcome as a compromise, similar in substance to the current Agreement.


The window to agree on a Brexit deal is closing

Brexit’s Level Of Uncertainty Reaches Record High

Delaying and praying seems to be the right summary of Theresa May’s latest strategy. Before yesterday’s statement there was always a date to look forward to that at least held the potential of bringing progress in Brexit negotiations.


Does anyone truly understand Brexit?

Does Anyone Truly Understand Brexit?

Chandra Roy | Back in June 2016, the Brexit referendum vote delivered a momentous verdict that defied all media speculation, procrastinators and polls delivering the unexpected result of a marginal majority to leave the European Union. But what exactly was under contention?