brexit


Brexit uncertainty: a drag on UK GDP in Q4 2019, Q1 2020 to improve

Brexit Uncertainty: A Drag On UK GDP In Q4 2019, Q1 2020 To Improve

Political uncertainty about the Brexit procedure caused the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) gross domestic product (GDP) to stagnate in the fourth quarter of 2019. However, the strong decrease in political uncertainty since the 12 December parliamentary election should allow the UK economy to rebound back to growth during the first quarter of this year, explains Janwillem Acket, chief economist at Julius Baer.



Conservative Majority Brings Some Certainty To The UK – For Now

Allianz GI / Victory for Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservative party in the UK general election is likely to be welcomed by markets and potentially boosts prospects for the UK economy. It doesn’t, however, end the Brexit uncertainty overnight – and the UK continues to be vulnerable to a late-cycle global environment.


UK general election: voters say ‘get Brexit done’’?

David A. Meier (Julius Baer) | Prime Minister Johnson’s Conservative Party grabbed a commanding victory. An orderly Brexit based on the withdrawal agreement is highly likely on 31 January. Given plenty of looming uncertainties during the transition period, such as the final UK-EU trade relationship and Scottish appetite for independence, we stick to a Neutral short-term British pound outlook.


Brexit

What can we expect from the UK elections?

“If the conservatives of Boris Johnson obtained the majority in the Parliament, the agreement of exit of the prime minister would return to the agenda of the new House and probably it would be approved. The United Kingdom will then begin the transition period (which in principle extends until the end of 2020) during which the future relationship with the EU will be defined,” analysts at Degroof Petercam point out.


UK general election: Of Brexit and fiscal spending plans

D. A. Meier (Julius Baer) | Based on a lead in polls, a Conservative majority is highly likely. Labour’s socialist manifesto seems too radical to spur a full catch-up. A hung parliament remains a considerable risk. After a Conservative victory, a moderate fiscal boost could limit the Brexit fallout. After a Labour win, its political agenda could erode its huge fiscal spending plans, despite a softer Brexit.

 


United Kingdom, a Singapore by the Thames?

Olivier de Berranger (La Financière de l’Échiquier) |”Let’s have fun”. Have the words of President Charles de Gaulle been prophetic? He was against the United Kingdom’s entry into the Common Market in 1963… More than 50 years later, although the tribulations of Brexit may cause amusement or disappointment, the truth is that they have been poisoning investors’ lives for more than three years, by separating them from British stocks. However, the outcome of this endless soap opera could well change the situation.


Brexit: Here we go again – deal or delay?

David Alexander Meier (Julius Baer) | Thursday’s EU summit is the last date to secure a deal before Saturday’s ‘deal or delay’ deadline. Due to difficulties in finding a deal and parliamentary ratification, we rather expect a delay. We remain short-term Neutral on the pound given a delay and long-term Bullish, as the only way to Brexit is through a deal.


Safe assets

“If we want a euro with more weight and a normal perception of risk, we need safe assets”

Ana Fuentes | After various decades in the private and public sector, Josina Kammerling, responsible for regulation at the CFA Institute, knows in detail the ins and outs of the financial market and its rules. She can therefore indicate its pros and cons. And do so in fluent English, Dutch, French or Italian … And also in perfect Spanish learnt as a girl in Burgos, where she moved when she was two: “My father opened the Heineken factory there” she recalls with a smile.