eurogroup

The Euro-bazooka Lacks Enough Ammunition

J.P. Marín Arrese | The Eurogroup painfully struck a middle of the road deal in its second meeting, once Italy and Holland agreed to compromise. At face value, the funding facilities amounting to half a trillion euros look rather impressive. Yet, a closer glance at them shows they lack the necessary ambition.


The Eurogroup Clog Rests On False Assumptions

J.P. Marín Arrese | The EU strategy for curbing the crisis stalled on Wednesday’s early hours as Holland and Italy bitterly clashed over the scope and conditions of the plans to support ailing partners. Minister Gualtieri rejected anything short of mutually guaranteed bond emissions. His Dutch counterpart flatly refused to envisage such a way out while insisting on demanding structural reforms from any beneficiary of the rescue fund. This row rests on wholly misleading assumptions.


Eurogroup Hits That Northern Wall Again: Eurobonds Are Neither There Nor Expected

After 16 hours of telematic meetings, the Eurogroup came close to reaching an agreement, but once again, that did not happen. Once again, it is postponing the decision until tomorrow, Thursday. Once again, it has failed. The Eurozone finance and economy ministers remain divided over the debt mechanism which will help the countries most affected by the pandemic to finance themselves. This division between North and South has a very clear figure: 500 billion euros are up in the air. 



Italian Banks: Definite source of contagion

Italy is threatening us with another time bomb. The country’s banks have 360 billion euros of doubtful loans and the EU (that is to say the sinister Eurogroup), as intelligent as ever, is pressuring for the bail-in rules, to which ultraliberal & co are so addicted, to be implemented by the book.


A Eurogroup Deal That Might Be Hard To Stomach

Yiannis Mouzakis via Macropolis | Following an 11-hour Eurogroup that brought back memories of other classic encounters between Greece and its lenders, an agreement was reached to disburse 10.3 billion euros from the programme’s financing in two tranches – next month and in September – as the much-contested debt issue was put on the table.


Greek banks will not need full amount of EU bailout

Athens may need no further than €10 billion to recapitalise its main financial institutions. These are the funds in the Hellenic Financial Stability Fund to cover the sector’s requirements. Looks like in Brussels there is a broader consensus that the figures revealed by the ECB are “encouraging”.


Greece's return

Greece in the month ahead

The Corner | April 2, 2015 | Manos Giakoumis, chief analyst with Greek financial website Marcropolis, speaks to The Corner about the most pressing issues currently confronting the Greek government. He notes that the ECB squeeze on Greek banks issuance of T-bills could prove problematic in the month ahead, and says that the thorny issue of privatisations could continue to thwart negotiations with the country’s creditors.


No deal for Greece as partners play hardball

The Corner | March 20, 2015 | There may be some volatility on European markets in the day ahead, as late night talks between the Greeek government and members of creditor nations, the European Commission and the European Central Bank failed to unlock funds for Athens’ faltering economy.