European investment

Something smells rotten in the City

What Brexit Doesn’t Kill Off Is Fodder For The City

The City’s conclusion is that, in relation to their size, the US private equity firms could dedicate more time and deploy more capital in Europe, to the benefit of everyone. But these firms still have doubts about the future of the Eurozone after Brexit. Other non-US and non-European actors are grabbing those opportunities reticent US investors are letting pass by.


“Spain would be one of the top destinations of a European investment agenda”

FRANKFURT | By Lidia Conde Martin Gornig is deputy head of department of Firms and Markets at the prestigious German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) in Berlin. The Institute conducts a working group that advises the Minister of Economy Sigmar Gabriel with the idea of increasing investments in Germany. Gornig and his team released a report last summer on the possibility of stimulating growth in Europe without changing the Stability Pact. The proposal of  DIW is to immediately mobilize the necessary investments “to boost growth in countries in crisis and avoid a new recession in the eurozone.” As France and Italy are demanding, the Institute bets on growth but warns that it should not be at the expense of a debt increase