Fed’s rates hike

Janet Yellen

Rates: Back to the waiting game

The FED not only held unchanged its rates in its last FOMC meeting last week. It plunged investors into utter disarray by delivering an extremely dovish message on future action. The prospect of a hike this year loses steam while bewildered markets pull back to the waiting game.



“We need to abandon this moralistic view on debt”

South Korean economist Ha-Joon Chang argues that although orthodox thinking is to cut debt, the most effective way for countries to grow is to boost their income. As for the recovery, this expert in emerging markets notes that the world economy is not really picking up in the way that it usually does after a big downturn. This is the first part of our conversation.



The Fed should act now

The Fed should act now

The Fed’s wavering over addressing the matter of its announced rate hike has badly affected the markets, increasing their volatility. It should act now, curbing any further speculation, and disregard recent calls from the IMF and the World Bank to further delay this move.




Daniel Tarullo

Meet the most important man in the Fed

CANCUN (MEXICO) | A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…” the Federal Reserve did not even announce its interest rate movements. Fed watchers had to infer the lending policy of the world’s most powerful central bank just by painstakingly perusing the documents–release, obviously, in paper–of the Fed’s open market operations.  

 

 

 


Jeb Bush the populist

SAO PAULO | June 20, 2015 | By Marcus Nunes via HistorinhasUS 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Jeb Bush has set his presidential goal at 4 percent growth and 19 million new jobs. To do that, he would first have to “recruit” the Fed. Unfortunately, if the Fed acquiesced bad things would happen.


UK US labour markets

US and UK separated by a common labour market performance?

LONDON | June 19, 2015 | UBS | There are some striking similarities currently between the US and UK labour markets. The unemployment rates are broadly the same, employment growth is similar, and the level of vacancies suggests continued jobs growth in both countries. Moreover, there are solid signs that pay growth has picked up in both the UK and US.