Lehman Brothers

Ten Years After Lehman, The Crisis Is Not Over

Currently no one is really satisfied on the way the great recession of 2008 has been solved. As Philippe Waechter, chief economist at Ostrum AM, points, “banks profitability is back to a higher level but, even with a stronger regulation, no one is totally convinced that it would resist to a new major crisis.”



Ten years after the Lehman Brothers crisis

Investors Are Not Concerned About Whether A Bank Is Systemic Or Not

Fernando Rodríguez  | Analysts who study banking stocks every day do not seem to pay much attention to the factors which condition the systemic banks. In general, they feel that whether a bank is systemic or not should not influence its stock market performance or its dividend policy. It should not be the only criteria for investing in a bank.


Don’t Worry, Corporate Leverage Only Just Back To Level Of 2007

AXA IM | Companies have re-leveraged their balance sheets since the global financial crisis (GFC), driven by low borrowing costs. Although heightened, corporate leverage is not currently excessive in developed markets, although we see signs of concern in emerging markets. In this note we assess whether we should be concerned about corporate leverage at current levels.


The U.S. debt drama – soap opera or Lehman quality?

HAMBURG | By Dr. Beate Reszat| Shortly after the US default had been averted on October 16, the S&P 500 closed at an all-time peak of 1,744.50. Alan Wheatley (Reuters) commented enthusiastically: “If Wall Street’s record high is a signpost, the U.S. economy has every chance of pulling further ahead of a stuttering Europe despite new battles to come in Washington over the government’s budget and debt ceiling.” Does this mean that all the worries of the past weeks about a “Lehman moment” were nothing but hot air? Is the debacle that we observed nothing more than an episode in an endless soap opera that long ceased to impress markets?


5 years since Lehman Brothers collapsed

MADRID | By JP Marin Arrese | In the aftermath of the world financial crisis, the G 20 solemnly committed itself to undertake a major overhaul to avoid such a disaster from happening again. The diagnosis rapidly identified a disproportionate risk appetite, coupled with lenders’ reckless confidence, as the main culprit. Deregulation and the benign neglect hailed by supervisory authorities as a hallmark for best practices also stood in the pillory. Yet, five years later, no major breakthrough in dealing with the core problems has been performed.


No Picture

Bye Goldman, bye Lehman!

NEW YORK | A double reminder of the American financial system burst was news today. On one hand, Warren Buffett earned a few hundred million dollars swapping his Goldman Sachs warrants for stocks of the company, maybe the single most lucrative bailout for a single investor. In a separate move, Lehman announced it is paying back more than $14 billion to its creditors