spain politics

Spain's government

Spain looks for another consensus in the centre

Fernando G. Urbaneja | Spanish electors closed on Sunday an intense electoral cycle, opened 5 years ago, under the impact of the great recession and technological uncertainty, which sketches out a new political map for the fourth country in the European Union.


Elections in Spain: Awaiting the next government with the economy far from the campaign

Joan Tapia (Barcelona) | As I write this article, three polls have been published – in three Spanish newspapers ABC, El Periodico de Catalunya and Confidencial – which practically agree. If there are no changes in the twenty days that remain before the elections, PSOE will be the largest party with more than 130 seats, far distant from the PP which will remain on 80-90 seats.


Spain’s New Deal

The Spanish right and centre parties have brokered an agreement for breaking the current political deadlock. The caretaker Cabinet has held office for nine agonizing months as two general elections failed to produce an outright winner. Even if the settlement reached between the caretaker Popular Party government and Ciudadanos marks a sizeable step forward, it will still fail to deliver enough parliamentary support for securing a stable government. The Socialist Party continue to firmly hold the key to power.


Why the Left needs to get ten points ahead of the Right to get absolute majority in Spain

WASHINGTON | By Pablo PardoLefty populism is on the rise in Spain, helped by the financial crisis, and a cascade of scandals that has so far tarnished all the traditional (i.e., pre-existing) parties from the Left and the Right. Podemos, the leftie, Hugo Chávez-inspired party that advocates defaulting on the Spanish debt (to the delight of The Financial Times) could win the elections, according to some polls.