spanish economy

recovery

Spanish Economy: Is Recovery Really on Track?

BARCELONA | By Joan Tapia | According to the Spanish government, the country is about to leave recession behind and be on track for the recovery. President Rajoy has insisted on that being the important issue, not the corruption scandal that has shaken his party. The euro zone is showing positive signs indeed but is Madrid’s position 100% credible?


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The shortest summer of Mr Rajoy is over

MADRID | By J.P. Marín Arrese | The Spanish PM has a hot agenda for the rentrée. Not only Mr Rajoy has to deal with the corruption scandal of his party but also with UK over Gibraltar’s dispute. The good news is that Spanish bonds yield is pretty low and giving Madrid some fresh air to reduce the deficit, still very high.



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Spain: numbers show optimism yet political tension grows

MADRID | By Ana Fuentes | Under a strong pressure after the scandal of illegal donations to the Popular Party, Spanish PM Mariano Rajoy will try to spend his summer holidays away from the public eye. Even if the economy is doing better and the Bank of Spain sees the end of the recession coming, citizens are austerity-wary and the political tension has not been eased at all.


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Spain Antifraud Law: Declared Foreign Assets Beat All Expectations

MADRID | The new antifraud law in Spain is bringing surprises on the table: more than 130,000 tax payers have declared assets held in foreign countries with an estimated total value of 87.7 billion euros, more than the double of  what Spanish Treasury estimated. The penalty is 150% of the tax due.


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Investors appetite for Spanish economy: will it last?

MADRID | By David Fernández | Foreign investors are showing a sudden interest in assets made in Spain due to, among others, central bank’s last data, Europe’s decision to delay the deficit commitment by two years and international factors such as second-round monetary helicopter launched by the Bank of Japan. Will this trend vanish?





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When will the crisis in Spain come to an end?

MADRID | Two German economic heavyweights are stirring the debate about the Spanish recovery: IFO President Hans-Werner Sinn, who recently said that “Spain will suffer 10 more years of crisis and an internal devaluation of 30%”, and Bundesbank Chairman’s, who thinks the crisis will last five more years. Both of them were as clear and firm as Germans usually are when speaking about Southern Europe.