Spain government

Pedro Sánchez chooses the left

Fernando G. Urbaneja | Pedro Sánchez, relative winner of the elections (with fewer votes and seats) has chosen the less rugged path to his investiture and to remain in power. He is returning to the original plan, that of the censure vote in June 2017 which allowed him to replace Rajoy. The pact with Iglesias was impossible in the last legislature (from May to June), which passed through months of mutual reproaches. Today it came about in an afternoon; a conversation in the Moncloa between Pedro Sanchez and Pablo Iglesias renewed the model of the pact to remove Rajoy with the argument of creating a “progressive” government, the key word which avoids other more precise words, like a government of the left.


Spain heads for a bumpy ride

J.P. Marín-Arrese | The Sánchez-led Cabinet will lack any steady support in Parliament for implementing a reasonable policy line.


Time for Spain to get a foreign policy

Spain: Is growth without stability possible?

Joan Tapia (Barcelona) | The possibility of new elections in November is beginning to sound the alarm about the ability of Spanish political parties to form coalitions. The Spanish economy is an animal of great strength which, once set going, is resistant and difficult to stop. So said to me a few months ago a distinguished Spanish economist who presides over one of the most respected think tanks.



Spain's government

Spain looks for another consensus in the centre

Fernando G. Urbaneja | Spanish electors closed on Sunday an intense electoral cycle, opened 5 years ago, under the impact of the great recession and technological uncertainty, which sketches out a new political map for the fourth country in the European Union.


The debt of Rajoy and Sanchez

Spain’s Motion Of Censure: Medium-Low Probability Of Being Successful

The Spanish government is facing a motion of censure. In the country’s parliamentary system, if one is presented it requires that an alternative candidate be put forward, who will certainly be the socialist Pedro Sánchez. The debate and the voting will be held on 31 May and 1 June, respectively. Considering the current composition of parliament, Bankinter’s experts provide below the three possible numeric combinations needed for the motion of censure to go through.