us banks

US banks trading income declines

Bond Portfolios Give US Banks Heavy Losses: From JPMorgan’s $7.4 Billion to BofA’s $3.4 Billion

Fitch explains that for large US banks “the sharp rise in interest rates across the curve led to unrealised losses in AFS (Available-for-Sale) securities portfolios with an estimated negative effect on CET1 ratios of 20-110bp”. Specifically, according to Bloomberg, JPMorgan reported latent losses of about USD 7.4 billion on a total of USD 313 billion of Treasuries and other bonds in its available-for-sale portfolio in the Q1’22 results announced last…



cajerocm

The Future of Bank Branches in the US

BBVA Research | The demise of the branch has been prophesised for decades, yet it still remains a crucial access point for bank services, valued by most bank customers. However, the question about the future of retail branches looms large as mobile and online banking are becoming ubiquitous, most routine retail banking services that do not involve cash are becoming available remotely, and as customers are ever more comfortable with the new technologies for accessing them.


Banks UBS

EPS estimates for global banks in 2015 cut by 3.4% over past year

Based on our latest in-house banking survey, sentiment towards the banking sector has deteriorated further over the past quarter. The decline in expectations on the banking outlook reflected rising global growth concerns, uncertainty over Fed funds rates, as well as volatility in commodity prices and currencies.



US banks

US banks must be kidding the EU

The Worden Report | Expertise in reducing the tax US banks pay in Europe does not make up for the greater ineptitude at those banks, so there is a significant possibility that they will go under.


foreclosure1

$25 billion US mortgage settlement: not quite there yet

NEW YORK | It would be great news for hundreds of thousands of people: billions of dollars (an estimated $25 billion) in aid to homeowners who have lost their homes to foreclosure or who are still at risk. The money would come from big mortgage banks: Bank of America, JP Morgan, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and Ally Financial. Why on earth would those banks be willing to pay that amount? They…