spanish politics

Pedro Sánchez falls short of majority but will likely prevail tuesday

Pedro Sánchez Falls Short of Majority, But Will Likely Prevail Tuesday

Atlantic Sentinel | Left-wing separatists would allow the social democrat to become prime minister a second time. Spanish Socialist Party leader Pedro Sánchez fell short of a absolute majority in Congress on Sunday to become prime minister a second time. However, left-wing separatists from the Basque Country and Catalonia have agreed to abstain from a second vote on Tuesday, which should allow Sánchez to scrape by with a majority of one.


Spain's left’s inability to unite against the right

Spain: Political instability at home continues, undermining influence abroad

Shaun Riordan | Pedro Sánchez has failed to secure election as Spain´s Prime Minister in the second investiture vote in the Spanish parliament today. He needed only a simple majority. But the break down in negotiations with Podemos, and their decision to abstain, left Sanchez´ socialist party (PSOE) in a minority. The problems between the two parties seem to have centred not on policy but on the distribution of ministerial portfolios in a coalition government. Sanchez conceded that Podemos could hold ministerial positions, but the far left party complained that the portfolios he offered lacked real substance.


Elections in Spain: Awaiting the next government with the economy far from the campaign

Joan Tapia (Barcelona) | As I write this article, three polls have been published – in three Spanish newspapers ABC, El Periodico de Catalunya and Confidencial – which practically agree. If there are no changes in the twenty days that remain before the elections, PSOE will be the largest party with more than 130 seats, far distant from the PP which will remain on 80-90 seats.


Time for Spain to get a foreign policy

Did We Really Need The Economist To Call Spain A Full Democracy ?

The Economist Intelligence Unit has published the 11th edition of its ranking on the global state of democracy. Of 165 countries in the world, Spain is ranked 19th for the quality of its democracy. It is not bad given the political instability Spain is experiencing. Nor the open breach in confidence following the crisis between citizens and politicians and citizens and economic powers. Nor taking into account Spaniard’ s tendency to self-flagellation.


Far-right populists break through in the Spanish politics too

Far-Right Populists Break Through In Spanish Politics Too

The elections in Andalucia have revolutionised Spanish politics with the the worst ever results for the socialist party (PSOE), which has been governing this autonomous community without interruption since 1978, and the entrance of the far right, in the form of the new party Vox, in the Spanish political map.


When the Supreme Court adds to the lack of confidence in Spanish politics

When The Supreme Court Adds To The Lack Of Confidence In Spanish Politics

Spain has gone almost three years without a government with a parliamentary majority. The worst part is that there is nothing on the horizon that would guarantee more stability. To this already very complicated panorama must be added that the Supreme Court has been incapable of arbitrating a solution acceptable for Spanish society about who should pay mortgage stamp duty.


Spanish political scene: a new mould after 40 years of democracy

Spanish Political Scene: A New Mould After 40 Years Of Democracy

Following the series of articles by William Chislett which The Corner is going to publish on the 40th anniversary if the Spanish Constitution, today we are dedicating to know the intricacies of Spain’s political life during these years of democracy. Between 1982-2015, this was dominated by two parties, the conservative Popular Party (PP) and the Socialists. They alternated in power until two upstart parties, centrist Ciudadanos (Citizens) and the populist-left Podemos (We Can) won a significant number of seats in parliament.


An unconvincing 2019 Spanish budget

An Unconvincing 2019 Spanish Budget

J.P. Marín- Arrese | The Spanish government has released its main budgetary lines, in a rather unusual and surprising way. For, it holds responsible the former PP Cabinet for most of the expenses plus a sizeable deviation from the deficit goal in 2018. The least one can say is that such a baffling message underlines its inability to curb the imbalance while enjoying power for the second half of this year.


Pedro Duque has acknowledged setting up a company to hold his own home

Justifying Tax Evasion Undermines Fiscal Rectitude In Spain

J. P. Marín- Arrese | Undoubtedly, former astronaut Pedro Duque enjoys ample recognition for his past feats. His nomination to the R&D Cabinet portfolio was widely praised and welcomed, even if he confessed his utter lack of experience for the job. Thus, news on his dubious record as a taxpayer came as a nasty shock. He has acknowledged setting up a company to hold his own home and a beach resort dwelling where he spent his holidays, thus reducing his tax bill.


There have always been two debates about RTVE: financing and the nomination of its board which, in theory, should govern it.

Good Governance For Spanish Public Television

There have always been two debates about the Spanish Public Television: financing and the nomination of its board which, in theory, should govern it. Experience says that it doesnt govern it, that the board is a scene for political party confrontation which adds no value, on the contrary.