Interviews

David Edgerton

David Edgerton: “Joining Europe Meant Liberalising The British Economy And That Hasn’t Changed In 50 Years”

Tristan de Bourbon (London) | “The United Kingdom joined the European project because the elite wanted to return to a much more open economy, to liberalise the British economy. They also discovered the United States would never treat the United Kingdom as an equal and would remain protectionist,” explains David Edgerton, Professor of History at King’s College London and author of the recent book The Rise and Fall of The British Nation, where he analyses the ideology behind the government’s action.


Ian Bremmer

Coronavirus: “The Loser, For The Moment, Is The West” Says Ian Bremmer

Pablo Pardo (Washington) | We don’t know yet what will happen but, for the moment, it is clear that the fact that China has apparently been able to contain the pandemic better than the US or much of the EU will considerably strengthen that country’s political appeal and capacity for influence. The loser, for the moment, is the West. The economic damage was inevitable. But the political damage, for example in the US, due to the lack of preparation and the scant attention paid to experts, could have been much less…


cristina garmendia

Cristina Garmendia: “Many Companies Are Giving Lessons On How To Behave”

Manuel Moreno Capa | This interview took place two weeks after the declaration of the State of Alarm, in place since March 15. And someone like Cristina Garmendia -scientist, businesswoman and former minister of Science and Technology- is surely amongst the best qualified to analyse many of the aspects concerning the biggest non-war crisis affecting us as far back as we can remember.


stiglitz

“The Global Legal And Economic System Is Biased In Favor Of Capital”

Pablo Pardo (Washington) | Joseph Stiglitz is undoubtedly the most famous Nobel Laureate in Economics in the world… after Paul Krugman. Also the most controversial and the one who has entered more directly into the public debate. However, he does not want to assess the Spanish political situation, despite the fact he has been an informal collaborator of Podemos since he received Pablo Iglesias in his office at Columbia University five years ago.


UMB5063

“Loyalty Shares May Make A Takeover Bid More Difficult And A Company Less Attractive”

Mari Pinardo | “Loyalty shares, which confer additional voting rights to investors who have held shares for two years, strengthen the position of majority shareholders and produce a gap between their economic commitment and their voting power. They can make a takeover bid more difficult, reduce liquidity and the value of a company less attractive,” says Maria Rotondo, co-director of the IE executive sustainability program.


ken fisher

“Political paralysis can be beneficial for the markets”

Pablo Pardo (Washington) | Ken Fisher is a curious multi-millionaire, who talks in plain language and loves the media. At 69, he is retired from the day-to-day management of his fund, Fisher Investments, which holds more than 100 billion dollars in management, and seems to be enjoying himself as a columnist in, among other media, the dailies Financial Times and USA Today and the weekly Forbes, where he sets out his ideas about markets in a plain language easily understood by everyone. And he does not hesitate to runs against the current when, for example, he says “I am not a fan of philanthropy”, although, it also has to be pointed out that he has donated millions to protect woods in the US, especially the redwoods, a species of sequoia which reach more than 100m high and are one of the largest trees in the world.


Safe assets

“If we want a euro with more weight and a normal perception of risk, we need safe assets”

Ana Fuentes | After various decades in the private and public sector, Josina Kammerling, responsible for regulation at the CFA Institute, knows in detail the ins and outs of the financial market and its rules. She can therefore indicate its pros and cons. And do so in fluent English, Dutch, French or Italian … And also in perfect Spanish learnt as a girl in Burgos, where she moved when she was two: “My father opened the Heineken factory there” she recalls with a smile.


Spain lacks activist investors

Carlos Sáez Gallego: “Spain is a country which has not seen activist shareholders”

Fernando G. Urbaneja | Carlos Sáez Gallego presides over the oldest of the three global proxy solicitors in Spain (1935), those entrusted with securing votes in support of the Board´s proposal in the shareholders´ general assembly. There “we recommend Spanish listed companies to international standards of corporate governance … 47% of their shares lie in international portfolios. That, which is good, sign of confidence, means more pressure to comply with those standards”.


"Trump is the best thing that has happened to Europe"

“Trump Is The Best Thing That Has Happened To Europe”

Lidia Conde (Fráncfort) | Daniel Dettling is professor, editor and president of the Future Institute of Berlin Zukunftspolitik, one of the most prestigious European think tanks in Euro trends and futures thinking. Advises parties, ministries and companies. In his last book, “An agenda for the Neorepublic”, he focuses on the configuration of a just future.


Ngaire Woods: "We are moving towards a globalisation sustained by empires"

Ngaire Woods: “We Are Moving Towards A Globalisation Sustained By Empires”

Pablo Pardo (Washington) | Dean of the Blatavnik School of Government, Ngaire Woods is one of the people closest to Robert Keohane, of Princeton University, one of the most influential international relations theorists in the world. Woods, whose doctoral thesis was on European monetary union, has specialised in global governance and the role of multilateral institutions, two questions which have been the centre of debate following the victory of Donald Trump and Brexit.