employment in spain

End of cycle for employment in Spain?

Employment In Spain Holds Up This time, But Duality In The Labour Market Continues To Wreak Havoc

Josep Mestres Domènech (CaixaBank Research)| In times of crisis, the reduction in employment traditionally occurred in Spain through a significant destruction of jobs, while in periods of expansion job creation was rapid. This has not been the case in this crisis. For the first time, the declines in GDP have been accompanied by a much smaller reduction in employment. This is not only due to the unique nature of this crisis, which originated in the health sphere, but also due to a very different response from economic policy.


Spain has highest proportion of contracts of 6 months or less

Black Friday For Employment In Spain

This year the end of summer has not just been bad but really bad for the Spanish labour market. The number of unemployed in Spain increased in August by 47,047. To find a similar rise in August you have to go back to 2011. Also the number of people that signed up to social security fell by 202,996, the worse data for August since 2008. Finally, the day 31 August became the one when the most jobs were destroyed in history.



Seat factory in Spain

Spain PMI below expectations, yet employment growth fastest in 8 years

The Corner | July 1, 2015 | Spanish manufacturing PMI, one indicator of the economic pace of a country, posted 54.5 in June, down slightly from 55.8 in May. However, operating conditions have now strengthened in each of the past 19 months, according to Markit analysts. Manufacturers reported having hired extra staff to meet higher production requirements and prospects of future growth.


More (yet less paid) employment in Spain

MADRID | By Luis Arroyo | Last jobless data in Spain were excellent in terms of unemployment rate reduction, the government pointed out on Thursday. But are they 100% reliable? Total worked hours have fallen and they continue to fall. That is, more Spaniards are working, yet more and worse paid hours. In the graph above: total working hours per week.