Articles by Pablo Pardo

About the Author

Pablo Pardo
Pablo Pardo is Washington DC correspondent of El Mundo. Journalist especialized in International Economics and Politics.
spanish politics

Why the Left needs to get ten points ahead of the Right to get absolute majority in Spain

WASHINGTON | By Pablo PardoLefty populism is on the rise in Spain, helped by the financial crisis, and a cascade of scandals that has so far tarnished all the traditional (i.e., pre-existing) parties from the Left and the Right. Podemos, the leftie, Hugo Chávez-inspired party that advocates defaulting on the Spanish debt (to the delight of The Financial Times) could win the elections, according to some polls.


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US companies: When having too much money is a bad sign (II)

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | Having €2.83 trillion in the bank and not knowing what to do with it is a problem that everybody would love to have. But it is actually a really serious problem for 316.1 million Americans, especially for those whose income increased by 0.43% in 2013. And, by extension, for the other 6.8 bn of human beings in the planet. Behind this problem there is a lack of investment opportunities, without which investment in the US will remain in a state of weakness and heavily dependent on an inability to increase consumption.


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US companies: When having too much money is a bad sign (I)

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | In the 1Q14, companies at Standard and Poor’s 500 spent more money to repurchase shares in comparison to the profits they had made during that period. And  third quarter data point in the same direction. Large American firms do this for several reasons, such as inflating their share price –because, the fewer number of shares, the more profits per share they’ll have, which in turn benefits  managers, who receive financial compensation in the form of company shares.


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Economic integration (particularly in Europe) provokes nationalism

WASHINGTON | By Pablo PardoSince the inception of constitutions in modern nation-states, none have undergone such turbulence as those drawn up in Europe. The raison d’être of the European Union is to avoid further turbulence in the future. It is no coincidence that the violent conflicts that have broken out in Europe since World War Two have been outside the EU, in former Yugoslavia, Ukraine, Russia, and Georgia.  


russia sanctions

Risk: Geography trumps Economy

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | Geopolitics have returned with a vengeance in Europe right when Barack Obama’s economist view of international relations seemed to be on track with the negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). The IMF warns that geopolitical risk is back on stage.


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IMF warns about the “optimism of the financial markets”

MIAMI | By Pablo Pardo | The director of the IMF’s Department of Financial and Monetary Affairs, José Viñals, has declared himself “worried” about “the optimism of the financial markets.” Viñals made his remarks at the LSE Global Pensions Program, organized by the London School of Economics, Santander Asset Management and Novaster. To an audience of around one hundred pension fund managers and regulators, most of them from Latin America, the IMF official remarked that “everybody investing” in what he called “heterogeneous assets” has “made money” this year, in spite of the fact that the “economic news, ‘surprises’ have been relatively bad.” 


No Picture

“We’ll see zero credit growth in the Monetary Union in the next 2 years”

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | Mark Zandi is chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, the department in charge of consulting, advising and providing services for businesses and financial institutions. Among its many activities, the firm advices several European banks with regard to the EBA’s and ECB’s stress tests. Moody’s created this department in 2007, after buying Economy.com –Zandi’s analysis company.


monty python

The Monty Python and BIS sadomonetarism

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | The Monty Python are back in London, and one of their most famous sketches revolves around the phrase “nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition.” The Bank of International Settlements (BIS) is like the Spanish Inquisition, only less funny and more predictable than the British surreal comedy group: it is the bearer of orthodoxy, even if it means sending everybody to the stake. Its prescriptions are suicidal in economic terms, wrong from a moral point of view, and unjust from a societal perspective. 


No Picture

Let’s hope Alan Krueger is wrong and Janet Yellen right

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | Maybe central banks and market participants are giving too much weight to the unemployment rate when trying to gauge future inflation. Instead, they should look at the short-term unemployment rate, because the long-term unemployed risk becoming economic pariahs. 


No Picture

NSA: Online surveillance is easy and it is cheap

WASHINGTON | By Pablo Pardo | It has been one year since, out of the blue, Edward Snowden came out to tell everybody that the Internet is ‘supervised’ by the NSA. And it has been only four days since British giant Vodafone announced that at least six different governments tap its calls. We have lost our online virginity, in case there were still some who had it (apparently, there were). Now we know that the wandering around Internet is almost as private as yelling in the middle of the street.